Project Description

The HEALING project raises hopes for the arrival of new substances to control stem cells. Apart from new disease therapies, the project promises major scientific advances as well as economic benefits. The partners collectively perform research to discover a solution that will be invaluable to the biotech and pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract

People suffering from degenerative diseases or chronic wounds eagerly await new treatment strategies. Stem cell research holds great potential for that – and this is the point where the research project HEALING comes into play. The Hedgehog-Gli signalling pathway is activated mainly in the early embryonic development stage, dictating the formation of the body axis and the limbs. In adult life, the Hedgehog-Gli pathway is generally less active. However, in some organs, especially the skin or
nervous system of the brain, Hedgehog-Gli signals are required for normal organ function. Excessive activity of the pathway can result in cancer formation and abnormal growth. Early and experienced researchers are trained in various topics, such as developmental genetics, stem cell and molecular biology, biochemistry or business skills etc. These qualifications are strongly required in their careers in both industry or science.

Project Details

Coordinator: 
Université de Genève, CH
Partners: 
accelopment AG, CH (service provider)
AnalytiCon Discovery GmbH, DE
Cancer Research Institute, UK
Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, ES
Foundation for Research and Technology, GR
Karolinska Institutet, SE
Paris-Lodron-Universität Salzburg, AT
Università di Roma La Sapienza, IT
Contact: 
Prof Ariel Ruiz i Altaba
Duration: 
01.11.2009 - 31.10.2013
Budget: 
3.6 million euro
Our Services: 
Funding Advice
Proposal Writing
Contract Negotiations
Project Management
Project Dissemination
Funding Programme: 
  • FP7-ITN
Area: 
Human Health

Testimonial

Prof Ariel Ruiz i Altaba, Université de Genève, CH

"Our project organization including the management structure was adapted to the needs of an FP7 Initial Training Network."

Prof Ariel Ruiz i Altaba, Université de Genève, CH