Project Description

The RISKSUR project is aimed to develop decision support tools for the design of cost-effective risk-based surveillance systems. These systems integrate the most recent advances in epidemiological methodologies, based on an interdisciplinary approach and tailored to the needs of individual EU Member States.

Abstract

To achieve the objectives mentioned above, the following strategies are used:

  • Bringing together a multi-disciplinary consortium of veterinarians, epidemiologists and economists.
  • Using extensive applied experience in design and implementation of animal health surveillance systems at farm, regional, national and/or international level and economic evaluation.
  • Involving business partners with applied expertise in animal health surveillance and the early adoption and translation of new technology to guarantee data access to ensure the development of practical solutions.
  • Collaborating with key stakeholders to ensure policy relevance such as veterinary administrations and the Chief Veterinary Offices (CVO) from different countries.

Project Details

Coordinator: 
The Royal Veterinary College, UK
Partners: 
accelopment AG, CH
Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency, UK
Arcadia International, BE
Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement, FR
Complutense University of Madrid, ES
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, IT
Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, DE
Dutch Animal Health Service, NL
Safoso AG, CH
Swedish National Veterinary Institute, SE
TraceTracker AS, NO
Contact: 
Prof Dirk Pfeiffer
Duration: 
01.11.2012 – 31.10.2015
Budget: 
4.0 million euro
Our Services: 
Proposal Writing
Contract Negotiations
Project Management
Project Dissemination
Funding Programme: 
  • FP7-KBBE
Area: 
Animal Health

Testimonial

Prof Dirk Pfeiffer, Royal Veterinary College, UK

"The challenge for academics is to recognise that successful proposals require more than high quality science and that they will therefore benefit tremendously from involving professional consultants such as accelopment."

Prof Dirk Pfeiffer, Royal Veterinary College, UK